Sports according to their competitive logic

types of sport attack or invasion

In attacking sports, one team of players must penetrate the other’s field.

Taking into account the internal logic of sport, that is, the operation of its rules, we can distinguish between:

Net sports. These are sports disciplines in which an obstacle or net intervenes that extends to different levels on the ground; commonly, players must prevent the ball or shuttle from coming into contact with the net, for example, in volleyball, tennis, ping-pong and badminton.
Combat sports. These are sports disciplines in which two or more competitors face each other physically, and whoever defeats the other wins the competition. For example: boxing, sumo, judo and taekwondo.
Wall sports. These are sports disciplines where a wall is used to bounce a ball in turns—for example, fronton, squash and paddle.
Precision sports. These sports disciplines require a fixed or moving target to be hit using various instruments or devices. This includes sports in which a ball is made to move to hit a target or enter a hole—examples: target shooting, archery, golf, bowling, dart throwing and pool.
Time and brand sports. These are sports disciplines in which you compete to record the shortest time, the most significant effort or the most significant distance in the performance of the same activity. Thus, players compete to see who is the fastest, most vital, and so on—for example, javelin throwing, weightlifting, 100-meter dash, cycling, and swimming.
Attack or invasion sports. These are sports disciplines where a team of players must enter the other’s field, usually controlling a ball, to score a point on the other’s court. In contrast, the rival team must try to prevent it and gain control of the ball for a counterattack—for example, football, basketball, rugby and hockey.
Field and hit sports. These are sports disciplines in which a team must use sticks or bats to hit a ball, and the rival must try to keep it under their control. They usually are sports that involve strength and speed—for example, baseball, cricket and softball.
Driving sports. These are sports disciplines in which you compete at the wheel of a land, air or water vehicle—for example,e motor racing, paragliding, windsurfing and sailing.
Technical-combinatorial sports. These are sports disciplines in which each competitor must complete a series of movements or physical skills in an agile, coordinated and aesthetic way so that later a jury evaluates and scores their performance, for example, figure skating, synchronized swimming, surfing and artistic gymnastics.

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